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Eoin May Reviews: Buck Knives 110+

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Need a blade that’ll take a licking and keep on ticking?

I feel like every time I saw my grandpa, he had his old Buck 110 in his overall pocket. Everyone knows what I am talking about: the brass frame, the patinaed wood scales, brass pins, and the clip point blade. Buck is arguably one of the most iconically American knife companies in the country; its first knife was made in 1963 by Al Buck. He revolutionized folding knives by combining strengths from other knife locks, while also making a reliable and usable folding knife for the avid outdoorsmen. The Buck 110 shortly became the staple of American toughness and was one of the most popular knives in the world for years. They’re basically indestructible; I have an original 1963 Buck and that 110 is still trucking along. Buck recently revamped the 110 and 112, giving it a bit of a 21st century face lift. Don’t worry—you still can buy the originals, but the new 110 is so much better.

The new Buck 110+ is 3ozs. lighter than the original. Instead of having the heavy brass frame they switched it with aluminum. Instead of wood scales, now they are micarta. The new 110 even has a thumb stud instead of the original fingernail stud. I carried this knife for weeks and it still is as tough as the originals. I was never a fan of Buck knives, as fast-action flippers are more my cup of tea, but the new knives from Buck really surprised me. You can actually one-hand open the 110+!

Another update that turns the 110 into a 110+ is the new steel from which it’s machined. The original is crafted from 420 high-carbon steel; the new versions use S30V. That type is pretty hard to sharpen but is very high in rust resistance and edge retention, so if you ever need it sharpened you can send it to Buck and they will sharpen it for you. The new 110s also come with a deep-carry pocket clip instead of the original leather sheath. All the additions they made to the 110 really blew me away. The 110+ has everything a new age knife does but still has that feel and durability of the classic.

I really encourage you to check the 110+ out. It’s super cool and can take a beating. They do run you around $150, but they will last a lifetime and longer. Buck has a forever warranty on any of their knives that are defective in material or workmanship. If you like American knives that are made with American products that will last a lifetime, go pick you up a 110+ from Buck.

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3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Frank Cardella

    August 15, 2022 at 11:48 am

    I love about 8 miles from the Buck factory in Post Falls, Idaho and just did a guided tour of the facility. I was blown away at the detail and process to make any model of knives. They said the 110+ is still the best seller. Another tidbit of information about it was they can .make 1,100 of them in a single day that takes 10 people from start to finish. This factory is huge and has machines that are still in use that were made during WWII that work perfectly and modified with computerized controls but kept the process the same. I am the proud owner of two new Buck knives and a t-shirt!

  2. Boyd W Dill

    August 15, 2022 at 3:57 pm

    I still have my Folding Hunter that I bought in the early ’70’s. i had to engrave my name, rate, and SSN on it to carry it on the flight decks of the USS Midway and USS Constellation. The leather case has a lot of miles on it. It has never let me down. I also have two Woodsman fixed blades, one of which snapped the tip off. I was digging out elk canines after recovering the bullet on a poached elk. I ground it down to a sheepsfoot point and it has been a very useful blade as well. The points on the two Woodman knives were different, with the first one having a more slender clip point. It is the one that snapped off. I love the feel of them in my hand.

  3. Torn

    August 16, 2022 at 4:44 pm

    Craftsman sells an identical knife to the 110, I suspect it is made by Buck. Even down to the leather sheath. Picked it up from a a store where I tried to replace my old Buck from the 70’s after the spring in it snapped. they offered that as a replacement as they were out of the Buck knives. Free is good.

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